ABSOLUTELY AUSTRALIA TRAVEL GUIDE & DIRECTORY

The Grampians National Park is commonly referred to as The Grampians, and also known as Gariwerd the traditional name for the Grampians. The Grampians is a national park located in the Grampians region of Victoria, Australia. The 167,219-hectare (413,210-acre) national park is situated between Stawell and Horsham on the Western Highway and Dunkeld on the Glenelg Highway, 260 kilometres (160 mi) west of Melbourne and 460 kilometres (290 mi) east of Adelaide. The Grampians are a series of 5 spectacular sandstone ridges running north to south with steep and craggy slopes on the eastern side and gentler slopes to the west. The Grampians National Park was listed on the Australian National Heritage List on 15 December 2006 for its outstanding natural beauty and being one of the richest indigenous rock art sites in south-eastern Australia.

The most popular walking area for day trippers is the Wonderland area near Halls Gap. In summer the ranges can get very hot and dry. Winter and spring are the best times for walking. The area is a noted rock climbing destination, and it is popular with campers and bushwalkers for its many spectacular views and unspoilt nature.

Autumn is the perfect season to visit the Grampians. Nature-lovers will savour the walking tracks, wildlife, lookouts and waterfalls in the breathtaking rugged landscape. In spring the Grampians wildflowers are a major attraction. Celebrate the Grampians food and wine, famous sporting spectacles, music, and more. See rugged mountains, vast plains, ancient Aboriginal rock art sites, unique native plants and animals, majestic waterfalls and vibrant wildflowers.

Learn about the indigenous culture of Gariwerd at Brambuk – the National Park and Cultural Centre. Discover ancient oven mounds, scatterings of stone left over from tool making, rock art sites and learn about the traditional beliefs handed down from one generation to the next. Motifs painted in numerous caves include depictions of humans, human hands, animal tracks and birds. Notable rock art sites include:

  • Billimina (Glenisla shelter)
  • Jananginj Njani (Camp of the Emu's Foot)
  • Manja (Cave of Hands)
  • Larngibunja (Cave of Fishes)
  • Ngamadjidj (Cave of Ghosts)
  • Gulgurn Manja (Flat Rock)