First Nation

65,000+ years in Australia

Always was, always will be

Always was, Always will be

Let's explore various ways we can celebrate and honour the richness and diversity of Indigenous culture.

Indigenous culture in Australia spans over 60,000 years. Although this culture has been suppressed through years of oppression and invasion, it is still strong and thriving. These Indigenous cultures remain an essential part of our Australian identity and have made significant contributions through art, language, land management, and much more. 

The best way to honour and celebrate Indigenous culture is to educate ourselves. There are countless events and resources available to help us understand Indigenous culture better. The National Gallery of Australia and the Australian Museum host a range of exhibitions year-round, including ones that showcase Indigenous art, culture, and history. We recommend checking online events calendars to keep track of what is coming up in your area.

Support Indigenous Artists & Designers

Another way to embrace and honour Indigenous culture is to support Indigenous artists and designers. Whether it is fashion design, painting, or sculpture, many incredible Indigenous artists are creating beautiful works of art. By appreciating and purchasing their work, we can contribute to their success.

Indigenous Language

Learning an Indigenous language is a great way to not only honour the culture but also maintain it. There are many Indigenous languages spoken across the country. However, most of them are endangered, so learning and using them is essential. There are resources like books, online courses and classes, and communities who are always willing to share their knowledge and language. Learning language helps strengthen bonds with Indigenous communities, providing a valuable insight into the culture and worldview.

Indigenous-run Tourism

Another way to honour Indigenous culture is by supporting Indigenous-run tourism businesses. There are several Indigenous-owned and operated tour operators, offering a mix of cultural experiences and nature-based activities. From guided bushwalks to cultural tours, these tourism operators provide an immersive experience into Indigenous culture and help pass the culture down to future generations.

Caring for the Land

Finally, we can show our support for Indigenous culture by supporting Indigenous-led conservation programs that focus on protecting their land. Throughout centuries, Indigenous people have been managing the land sustainably and have helped maintain biodiversity. Today, there are organisations that work in close collaboration with Indigenous communities to help manage and conserve natural and cultural values of their land.

Indigenous culture is rich, diverse, and worth celebrating. By educating ourselves, supporting Indigenous artists and designers, learning the language, supporting indigenous tourism businesses, and participating in conservation efforts, we can contribute to the continuation and growth of the Indigenous culture. As we endeavour to create a more inclusive future, respecting Indigenous culture is key, and by celebrating the culture, we can build better community ties and embrace our rich cultural heritage. Let’s honour the Indigenous people whose footprint is ingrained on the land and will continue to do so always was and always will be.




14 Jul 2023

Exploring Western Australia with Free Camping
Exploring Western Australia with Free Camping

Read on for a few tips on where to find some of the best free camping spots in WA!

Surfing in Australia
Surfing in Australia

Surfing captured the imagination of locals and quickly built up a cult of devotees and proceeded to capture the imagination of sporting Australians.

Another 25 Facts about Australia
Another 25 Facts about Australia

We've looked at some other facts about Australia. So now here are some more fun & interesting facts that you may not known about Australia.

Atherton Tablelands
Atherton Tablelands

The Atherton Tablelands is a highland region of northern Australia near Cairns, Queensland.

Eucla on the Nullarbor
Eucla on the Nullarbor

Eucla is located approximately 13 kilometres west of the South Australian border. Established in 1877 as a manual repeater station for the Overland Telegraph.

Menzies
Menzies

Menzies is a historic gold mining town where in 1894, a prospector named Robert Menzies stubbed his toe on the rich gold bearing rocks during the "gold rush".

Bruny Island / Adventure Bay
Bruny Island / Adventure Bay

Bruny Island is a popular day trip from Hobart, the north is flat grazing land and the south is hilly and heavily timbered.

Kambalda
Kambalda

Kambalda is located 55km south of Kalgoorlie and was Australia’s first nickel town, built by Western Mining in the 1960s.

Busselton
Busselton

Busselton is a coastal city & the gateway to the South West. It is one WA's earliest settlements and has repeatedly been voted WA's top tourist town.

Coolgardie
Coolgardie

Coolgardie is located 550km east of Perth and the birthplace of the great gold rush of 1892.



TOP