Russell Falls Mount Field National Park.

Tasmania

Home to untouched beaches, lush rainforests, crystal clear lakes, and snow-capped mountains, Tasmania has something for everyone.

Whether you’re looking for an adventure in nature or just need some peace and quiet away from the city life, Tasmania offers travellers a unique opportunity to explore one of Australia’s most captivating locations.

History & Culture

Tasmania is home to a rich history and vibrant culture. The island was first inhabited by Aboriginal peoples about 40,000 years ago, who called it “Trowenna” or “Land of the Big Water.” The European settlement started in 1803 when Lt. John Bowen arrived on the HMS Calcutta with settlers from Sydney. Since then, the island has become an important part of Australia’s economic and cultural life.

Travellers can experience the history and culture of Tasmania first-hand by visiting its many museums, galleries and historic sites. In Hobart alone, there are several museums dedicated to telling stories about local history—from the Tasmanian Maritime Museum to the Tasmanian Museum & Art Gallery. There are also plenty of opportunities throughout the island to learn more about its Aboriginal heritage at places like Wybalenna Aboriginal Centre in Flinders Island and Risdon Cove Historic Site in Hobart.

The Great Outdoors

Tasmania is also known as an outdoor paradise where visitors can explore breath-taking landscapes and participate in thrilling activities like hiking or kayaking. The Huon Valley offers plenty of hiking trails that wind their way through forests and along rivers and mountainsides; meanwhile Freycinet National Park is a great spot for beachside walks or canoeing around sheltered coves filled with wildlife (such as wallabies). Of course, no trip would be complete without taking advantage of all that Tassie has to offer on its waters--whether it's white water rafting down wild rivers or fishing off its pristine beaches!

With its stunning landscapes and fascinating cultural attractions, Tasmania is a must-see destination for travellers looking for an unforgettable experience Down Under. From exploring ancient Aboriginal sites to venturing out into nature for some adventurous activities—there’s no shortage of things to do here! Whether you plan on visiting alone or with friends or family—one thing’s certain: your visit will be one that you won't soon forget!


TASMANIA AT A GLANCE

  • You will find rare species of plants and animals in Tasmania's 20 national parks.
  • Tasmania has spectacular views, world renowned wilderness, clean air, cool fresh water, rich soil and gourmet produce.
  • Tasmanian beer is brewed from some of the cleanest water in the world, and the green pastures of King Island ideally suit the area to cheese making.
  • Landscapes range from mountains, waterfalls, glassy lakes and alpine tarns to tannin rivers, vast plains and beaches.
  • Forests comprising of native rainforest, open eucalypt forest, and plantation now cover about 3,317,000 hectares (8,192,990 acres), or 49% of Tasmania.
  • There are over 1,000 kilometres of bushwalking tracks and routes in Tasmania.
  • Cradle Mountain Lodge is an iconic, unique wilderness experience and is the closest you can be to the entrance of the spectacular World Heritage-listed Cradle Mountain-Lake St. Clair National Park.
  • A signal station was set up at Low Head in 1805. It is Australia's oldest continuously used pilot station. The light station, established in 1833, was Australia's third and Tasmania's second.

Tasmania is an ideal destination for self-drive holidays, with endless reasons to stop, explore and create an itinerary as you travel. The Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area protects one of the last true wilderness regions on Earth and encompasses a greater range of natural and cultural values than any other region on Earth.

THINGS TO SEE

Information Bay

Emergency:  000

Police:  000

Country Code:  +61

Area Code:  8

Roadside Assistance:  RAC

TAS COVID-19 Information & Restrictions
Restrictions, Updates, Travel Alerts, Lockdowns, Border Closures & Vaccinations

Public & School Holidays

TAS Public Holidays:
2022-2024

TAS School Holidays:
2022-2023

 

TAKE ME THERE ...

  • Cradle Mountain: Tasmania's Natural Wonder
    Cradle Mountain: Tasmania's Natural Wonder
    Tasmania is a treasure trove of natural wonders with Cradle Mountain being its crown jewel.
  • Bruny Island / Adventure Bay
    Bruny Island / Adventure Bay
    Bruny Island is a popular day trip from Hobart, the north is flat grazing land and the south is hilly and heavily timbered.
  • Bridport
    Bridport
    Bridport is known for its excellent fishing - scallop, trout and lobster, its wonderful beaches and fantastic holiday atmosphere.
  • Port Arthur
    Port Arthur
    Port Arthur is one of Tasmania's most popular tourist destinations located on the Tasman Peninsula.
  • Campbell Town
    Campbell Town
    Campbell Town is located about half way between Hobart and Launceston & well known for it's heritage buildings.
  • Coles Bay
    Coles Bay
    Coles Bay is a small town gateway to The Hazards, Wineglass Bay and Freycinet Peninsula with a small population of 110.
  • Freycinet Peninsula
    Freycinet Peninsula
    Freycinet Peninsula is well known for its white sand beaches and the most beautiful clean water in Tasmania.
  • Russell Falls
    Russell Falls
    Get ready for an adventure at Mt Field National Park's Russell Falls, a beautiful tiered-cascade waterfall located in Tasmania's Central Highlands.
  • Mt Wellington Lookout
    Mt Wellington Lookout
    Mount Wellington, is known officially as Kunanyi / Mount Wellington, is a mountain in the southeast coastal region of Tasmania and is the summit of the Wellington Range.
  • Tasman Fountain
    Tasman Fountain
    The Tasman Fountain (1988) is the work of local sculptor Stephen Walker. It is situated in Salamanca Place between Gladstone Street and Montpelier Retreat.
  • Port Arthur
    Port Arthur
    Port Arthur is a small town and former convict settlement, and now a popular historic landmark, built in the 18th & 19th century on the Tasman Peninsula.
  • Dockyard Slipway
    Dockyard Slipway
    Ship building was introduced on a large scale to Port Arthur in 1834. Only convicts deemed well-behaved and receptive to training were allowed to work at the dockyard.
  • Gordon Dam
    Gordon Dam
    Also known as the Gordon River Dam, is a major gated double curvature concrete arch dam with a controlled spillway across the Gordon River, located in South West Tasmania.
Freycinet Peninsula
Freycinet Peninsula

Freycinet Peninsula is well known for its white sand beaches and the most beautiful clean water in Tasmania.

Tasmania - Overview
About Tasmania

Tasmania is an ideal destination for self-drive holidays, with endless reasons to stop, explore and create an itinerary as you travel.

Bridport
Bridport

Bridport is known for its excellent fishing - scallop, trout and lobster, its wonderful beaches and fantastic holiday atmosphere.

Cradle Mountain: Tasmania's Natural Wonder
Cradle Mountain: Tasmania's Natural Wonder

Tasmania is a treasure trove of natural wonders with Cradle Mountain being its crown jewel.

Port Arthur
Port Arthur

Port Arthur is one of Tasmania's most popular tourist destinations located on the Tasman Peninsula.

Campbell Town
Campbell Town

Campbell Town is located about half way between Hobart and Launceston & well known for it's heritage buildings.

Tasmania Surf Spots
Tasmania Surf Spots

In Tasmania & want to find out the best surfing spots? We have them for you.

Bruny Island / Adventure Bay
Bruny Island / Adventure Bay

Bruny Island is a popular day trip from Hobart, the north is flat grazing land and the south is hilly and heavily timbered.

Coles Bay
Coles Bay

Coles Bay is a small town gateway to The Hazards, Wineglass Bay and Freycinet Peninsula with a small population of 110.



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